70 Resources to Support Eating Disorder Recovery

Recovering from an eating disorder can look different for everyone. There are many types of eating disorders and treatment options that may be recommended by a care provider. It’s common for people in recovery to receive support from a multidisciplinary care team that may include a dietitian, therapist, psychiatrist, support group, social worker, cardiologist and primary care provider, as well as friends and family members.

The resources in this article are for informational purposes only; individuals should consult with a licensed health care provider before taking action.

COVID-19 Resources

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Signs and Symptoms of Eating Disorders

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Understanding Different Types of Eating Disorders

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Treatment and Recovery Options

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Free and Low-Cost Resources

  • The Recovery Warrior Show, Recovery Warriors: podcast about support and inspiration for people who are recovering from an eating disorder.
  • Recovery Record: mobile app people in recovery can use to find support resources including coping mechanisms, structured meal plans and a secure chat line for help.
  • Rise Up + Recover, Recovery Warriors: mobile app with tools for managing eating disorders.
  • Jouvrie: dual-purpose app that can be used by patients in recovery or people in their support system. It provides a food diary, coping mechanisms, screening tools and information for more help.
  • Chats from the Living Room, Morningside (PDF, 318 KB): free weekly video conference for people in recovery to find support from health care professionals.
  • 18percent: free mental health channel on Slack where users can chat with each other for support and community.
  • Chat Rooms, Beat Eating Disorders: list of chat rooms for people in the U.K. to connect with each other and find support.
  • The Eating Disorder Recovery Podcast: podcast where hosts discuss the psychology of eating disorders, body image and recovery processes for a variety of eating disorder diagnoses.
  • ED Matters Podcast: weekly podcast that covers timely topics for people in different age groups and sexual minorities, including recovery while social distancing.
  • Dietitians Unplugged Podcast: monthly podcast series that features registered dietitians as guests and discusses healthy, body image and intuitive eating practices.

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Where to Find a Dietitian

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Finding a Mental Health Counselor or Therapist

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Support Groups for Eating Disorders

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Books About Eating Disorder Recovery

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Helping Someone with an Eating Disorder

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Hotlines for Immediate Help

  • NEDA Helpline: phone and chat line available during business hours from Monday through Friday, for seeking support or resources for you or a loved one. Call 800-931-2237.
  • ANAD Helpline: phone line with professionals available from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT from Monday-Friday to offer support, information about eating disorders and treatment options. Call 630-577-1330
  • The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) HelpLine: connect by phone or email to a HelpLine volunteer who can answer questions, offer support and provide practical next steps. Call 1-800-950-6264
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: If you or someone you know is in crisis—whether they are considering suicide or not—call the toll-free Lifeline at 800-273- 8255 to speak with a trained crisis counselor 24/7.
  • The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline: free, confidential, 24/7, 365-days-a-year treatment referral and information service (in English and Spanish) for individuals and families facing mental and/or substance use disorders. Call 1-800-662-4357.
  • 7 Cups of Tea: anonymous, free platform to speak with volunteer listeners available 24/7 to give emotional support over online chat.
  • Crisis Text Line: 24/7 text line for anyone to anonymously speak to a trained professional about mental health concerns. Text HOME to 741741.

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Are you interested in supporting people living with mental and behavioral health conditions? Learn more about how to become a licensed clinical social worker.

This article was published in May 2020.